Research Curriculum​

The Saybrook University Department of Research offers interdisciplinary research courses for students across the University.

Doctoral Research Sequence

Saybrook's doctoral research requirements are designed to provide a sequence of research experiences that are designed around 7 program-level learning outcomes that prepare students for the successful completion of the dissertation.  Students enrolled in doctoral programs that utilize the Department of Research courses will take between four and six Research courses before advancing to their dissertation courses.

Doctoral Research Program Outcomes
PLO1: Research Literature    Students demonstrate the ability to identify, critically evaluate, summarize, and synthesize published research in their field.  
PLO2: Research Logic and Design Students demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method research, including philosophical assumptions, research design, and specific research methods.
PLO3: Data Collection Students identify, assess, and select from various types of data and data collection strategies as part of the review of existing studies or in the design of original research.
PLO4: Data Analysis Students identify, assess, and make choices about analysis strategies as part of the review of existing studies or in the design of original research.
PLO5: Reporting Research Students critically evaluate reported research and effectively present empirical research for scholarly presentation or publication.
PLO6: Research Ethics Students critically evaluate ethical issues in existing research and demonstrate an understanding of intellectual property, human subjects protections, and referencing research with integrity and in alignment with professional ethical standards.
PLO7: Research and Practice Students demonstrate the connection between research and practice. Students explain how research findings inform practice and how practice suggests research topics.

Master's Research Sequence

Saybrook University's Master’s research sequence is also designed around 7 program-level learning outcomes that prepare students to be successful consumers of research. Depending on the specific master's program, students will take from one to three research courses for their master's program.  Research program outcomes coincide with, and support, academic program goals.​

Master's Research Program Outcomes
PLO1: Research Literature    Students demonstrate the ability to identify, critically evaluate, summarize, and synthesize published research in their field.  
PLO2: Research Logic and Design Students demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method research.
PLO3: Data Collection Students identify and assess various types of data and data collection strategies as part of the review of existing studies.
PLO4: Data Analysis Students identify and assess different analysis strategies as part of the review of existing studies.
PLO5: Reporting Research Students critically evaluate reported research and effectively present empirical research in the support of scholarly arguments and evidence-based decisions.
PLO6: Research Ethics Students critically evaluate ethical issues in existing research, demonstrate an understanding of intellectual property, and reference research with integrity and in alignment with professional ethical standards.
PLO7: Research and Practice Students demonstrate the connection between research and practice. Students explain how research findings inform practice.

Scaffolding Learning

In both the master’s and doctoral research sequences, research learning outcomes are introduced and developed during the foundation research courses and then advanced across the research sequence. 

Research Design

In line with the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) ​Quality Framework, the Saybrook Department of Research courses are designed with active learning exercises that engage students in discussion and practice activities to develop research skills and knowledge that are measured in key assignments.​  Course grades are weighted based on three learning activity groups: discussion learning activities, practice learning activities, and key assignments.  Discussion learning activities involve interactions among students or between students and their faculty.  Practice learning activities involve individual skill development and many times prepare students for their course key assignments.  Key assignments are learning activities that align with multiple course learning outcomes and are connected to the research program assessment.​​​